Four Poignant Minutes from 'This American Life'

historical-photos-pt3-martin-luther-king In celebration of Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday, do yourself a favor and listen to the following four-minute clip from This American Life, Episode #188. The entire episode, which centers on children using "perfectly logical arguments and arriving and perfectly wrong conclusions," is titled Kid Logic. It originally aired in June 2001 and has been making its rounds ever since because it's just. that. good. If you haven't heard it, and hopefully you already have, be prepared. It might may you cry. It will definitely make you think.

(Among Kid Logic's other highlights is the hilarious and adorable story of a little girl who, in second grade, comes home from school announcing that she has finally discovered the true identity of the tooth fairy. Listen here.)

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Also, a quick thank you to Kids on the Coast, an online magazine in Australia, for including me in its Jan. 17 article Believe It or Not. You're good people, Australia.

The Game-Changer: 'I Have a Dream'

I saw Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream Speech" for the first time earlier this month. I'd seen and read bits and pieces of it before, but watching it in its entirety was something quite different. I had always thought of King as a courageous man, but the Dream speech, given during the March on Washington August 28, 1963, reminded me of his extraordinary confidence and grace, as well.

It was his unshakable confidence that struck me the most. The way he spoke to all those supporters lining the National Mall, it was as though he was guaranteed to succeed where others had failed, as though his dream were guaranteed to come true.

Of course, King couldn't have known what changes would come. And he certainly couldn't have known that 46 years later — the day before the country celebrated his birthday — a black man would be sworn in as president of United States. King couldn't have known that nearly 4 million people would flood the National Mall, the way his supporters had, to witness the event.

No, he couldn't have known. But as forward-thinking as he was, I get this sense he wouldn't have been surprised, either.

I don't think I'll ever forget casting my ballot for Barack Obama on Nov. 4, 2008, or seeing those election returns roll in. I don't think I'll ever forget how emotional I was to see the newspaper the next day, or to watch the new First Family greet supporters after the inauguration. Although Obama was the one doing most the waving and smiling during those first few days, the victory didn't belong only to him. It belonged to Martin Luther King, Jr., too. And, in a way, it belonged to us all.

Sometimes it still seems like a dream.

http://youtu.be/smEqnnklfYs

This post originally appeared on Jan. 16, 2012