Religious Charm Bracelet, Anyone?… Anyone?

All-Religions Charm Bracelet

Okay, I suspect you guys are going to make fun of me a little bit for this, but, hey, what the hell. So, let me preface this by saying that, growing up, my mother had a charm bracelet she wore on special occasions. I was FASCINATED by this bracelet, which strung together all kinds of little golden goodies symbolizing some of my mom's greatest memories. There was a child's ring, a graduation cap, a locket. But my favorite charm was a little money box containing the tiniest folded-up dollar bill I'd ever seen in my life. A little door on the top opened and closed, and I must have opened and closed it hundreds of times. That bracelet mesmerized me. I remember asking (often) what all those symbols meant to my mom, where they came from. What's more: the bracelet was so darn pretty — and jangly. Very jangly. That was definitely a draw.

So fast forward, like, 25 years, and I'm in a bead shop for no apparent reason (I do not make jewelry and have no interest whatsoever in beadwork), and I happen upon what can only be described as a fuckload of religious symbols. There must have 200 different kinds in this shop. Most were Christian (I live in America, after all), but some other religions were represented, as well.

So I got this hair-brained idea to, you know, make a charm bracelet for my daughter, Maxine.

Okay, before you go off half-cocked, hear me out. Here was my thinking:

1. It's important to me that Maxine knows about religion in general, not just the one religion most prevalent in her culture. By stringing all these symbols together, side by side, I'd be putting all major religions on par with one another — with none of them more (or less!) significant than the next.

2. I'd like for Maxine to recognize religious symbols and have some sense of their back stories. It's a challenge sometimes, though, to introduce the basic concept of religion without, you know, boring her to tears. I figured if Maxine had a bracelet with religious symbols in her jewelry box, she might drag it out every once in a while and look at it. If I got lucky, maybe she'd even ask a question or two.

3. As you know, I love the idea of celebrating religious holidays with kids — rather than shying away from them, or even secularizing them. I see holidays as an opportunity to demystify religion, but also to promote religious literacy and religious tolerance. Symbols (the dreidel for Hanukkah or the Buddha for Vesak Day, for example) are fantastic memory aids. A bracelet, I thought, could come in kinda handy.

So there, in this cheesy bead store, I decided to go for it. With no trouble at all, I found a Star of David, a little dreidel and a charm imprinted with Mary and the baby Jesus. I also found  the Buddha and a yoga guy and about a million crosses — both with and without the crucifixion. I knew I wanted the former because the crucifixion is such an interesting (and ghastly) image, it can't help but be compelling. Carting all this stuff around definitely got the bead lady's attention. She asked me if she could help, and when I told her what I wanted — "to make an all-religions charm bracelet" is how I put it — she immediately got on board, tracking down the "Om" and yin/yang symbols to add to my pile

When I got home, I got out my pliers and put it all together.

The bracelet isn't nearly finished — there are so many other religious symbols out there! — nor is it as pretty, heavy, classy or valuable as my mom's. But it's a start. And it jangles real nice.

So what do you think, guys? A good idea? Potentially helpful? Or a total waste of money?